Instrumentation Control Training

Programmable Logic Controls (PLCS)

Programmable Logic Controls (PLCS) Courses

Instrumentation Control Training

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

The field of electronics deals with information in the form of electrical signals. Most of the electrical signal information that people encounter is in analog form. An analog signal is one that is continuously variable between the minimum and maximum values. This course begin with a discussion on digital and analog signals, covers truth tables and common logic functions, and then concludes with logic circuits and analog conversions.

Duration: 0.40 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) is a computer that is designed to be used in industrial applications. The PLC has a specialized operating system that carries out a set of user instructions over and over again. This course will discuss what a PLC is as well as common PLC components and applications.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • State the purpose of a PLC
  • Describe the hardware elements that make up a PLC
  • Describe the operation of a PLC
  • Differentiate between the operational modes of a PLC
  • List different techniques for programming a PLC
  • List the advantages of ladder logic
  • Describe the purpose of a rung in ladder logic

Duration: 0.40 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programmable logic controllers, or PLCs, are specialized, robust industrial computers. They are designed to continuously control equipment and processes based on process inputs and logical control programming. One of the most common ways to program this type of computer is a technique called ladder logic. This is a technique that provides a visual representation of the logic flow which helps with both initial programming and subsequent troubleshooting. This course discusses the background of ladder logic as well as basic instruction types such as examine if closed and examine if opened. This course also illustrates several varying ladder logic examples such as a lamp, motor starter, and garage door.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of a PLC
  • Discuss the hardware elements that make up a PLC
  • Describe the operation of a PLC
  • Identify the difference between the different modes of operation of a PLC
  • Discuss the advantages of ladder logic
  • Identify three common instructions used in ladder logic programming
  • Explain the difference between the use of an XIC and XIO instruction
  • Describe the purpose of a rung in ladder logic

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programming a PLC system provides the basic technical skills and knowledge necessary to work with programmable logic control systems typically found in an industrial or manufacturing environment. This interactive online course is designed to equip the novice with little or no prior PLC programming experience with the basic tools necessary to create a complete PLC program using ladder logic common to most current platforms.

Upon completion, you will be able to use programmable logic controllers to solve machine and process problems. A systems approach to PLC programming training is used because the programmable logic controller is one major component of larger manufacturing systems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the operation of timers and counters
  • Differentiate between the four fundamental types of timers
  • Describe the functions that extend basic ladder logic to allow other types of control
  • List good programming habits

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This interactive online course offers a thorough introduction into programmable logic controllers (PLCs). We will begin with an overview of the history and the role PLCs play in factory automation. We will discuss the basic principles of PLCs and core modules of an industrial control system. Functions (analog input and output), disturbed control interface, I/O’s (digital inputs and outputs), the COU, and isolation power will also be examined.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define a PLC
  • Discuss the functionality of a PLC
  • Describe the software used with PLCs
  • Describe the hardware that is used with PLCs

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, MobileReady

This interactive online course includes a comprehensive look at basic electrical circuits and includes information on converting a schematic to LAD instruction. Logic operations include any operations that manipulate Boolean values. Boolean values are either true or false and they are named after English mathematician George Boole, who invented Boolean algebra, and is widely considered the founder of computer science theory. They can also be represented as 1 and 0. Normally, 1 represents true, and 0 represents false, but it could be the other way around.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify basic electrical circuits and components
  • Differentiate between basic logic operations
  • Explain Boolean logic
  • Identify the basic and complex Boolean operators

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, MobileReady

This interactive online course is designed to help you understand the hardware used in PLC’s as well as how discrete and analog inputs and outputs permit the programmer to aid machinery in performing at a more efficient and stable state. Inputs are signals or data received by a system and outputs are the signals or data sent from it. Input/output (I/O) devices are used by a human, or system, to communicate with a computer. For instance, a keyboard is an input device for a computer, while a monitor is an output device.

This course will examine the primary causes of faults associated with PLC based control systems: I/O devices and field wiring. We will discuss both hardware and software which will aid in finding these faults quickly. You will be introduced to analog inputs and outputs. These include sensors and actuators that will be of use for industrial measurements and movements.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify analog inputs and outputs
  • Identify analog sensors and actuators
  • Differentiate between analog and discrete inputs and outputs
  • Describe the general principles behind digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, MobileReady

Automation in the manufacturing industry can improve production output and reduce costs. A modern, competitive workforce must be technically literate and know the ins and outs of programmable controllers. New state of the art electrical and electronic devices and equipment use PLCs to increase manufacturing flexibility, simplify processes, and improve safety. Automation also allows a better quality of life for workers while maintaining quality, efficiency, and a market for the product produced.

This interactive online course is designed to give you the ability to size and select the controllers necessary for the job at hand. While it is uncommon for engineers to build their own controller designs, it is the engineers’ responsibility to effectively communicate their design intentions.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain how to size and select controllers for a given application
  • Describe how to design a PLC to improve the safety of a system
  • Select the proper enclosure for a PLC to prevent damage
  • Discuss good installation practices

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, MobileReady

Most PLC system problems are hardware related, and most of these are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur, and they are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This module will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems. It will also explore techniques and the hardware and software tools that are available for isolating software problems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • PLC Familiarization
    • Explain how to select drives and start software.
    • Describe the major parts of PLC memory and memory protection PLC Processor Indicators
    • Discuss PLC processor indictors.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Most PLC system problems are hardware related, and most of these are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur, and they are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This module will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems. It will also explore techniques and the hardware and software tools that are available for isolating software problems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Program Troubleshooting
    • Discuss using PLC status and configuration files.
    • Discuss program control and troubleshooting command
    • Identify word instructions.
    • Examine the parts of a data monitor.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Human-machine interfaces, or HMIs, come in many forms. Generally speaking, the simplest HMIs are the hard=wired pushbutton operator interfaces found on many machines. Other applications may use dedicated graphic interfaces or PC-based HMIs that can communicate through a network and are customized for a particular machine or process.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe HMIs and personal computers used as HMIs.
  • Discuss pushbutton and touch-screen HMI inputs.
  • Describe HMI communication with “blue hose” and Ethernet connections.
  • Identify how HMIs can be used for monitoring, data collection, and logging

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

The most visible parts of the programmable logic controller system are the input system and the output system, the I/O for short. The I/O systems are the interfaces between the PLC processor and the world. A programmable logic controller is a microprocessor-based system that operates on low voltages, typically 5 volts. The real-world devices that control machines or processes operate on a wide range of voltages and currents, as high as 240 volts AC or 125 volts DC. This course will examine the various ways in which real-world devices can be connected to the input and output systems of a programmable logic controller.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the three types of I/O modules.
  • Describe the differences between sourcing and sinking I/O modules.
  • Explain the different types of device networks.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Whenever programmable logic controller s(PLC) systems are installed, whenever hardware is modified to fit the needs of changing applications, or whenever the PLC program is changed to accommodate changes in the process or machine operation, the people who do the work must have a thorough understanding of the system. Installation and maintenance in a PLC-controlled system refers not only to the PLC hardware but also to the PLC program. This course will focus on some of the basics involved in installing and maintaining PLC equipment.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe what factors must be taken into consideration when mounting PLC hardware.
  • Explain how to configure and populate a chassis.
  • Describe the considerations involved in wiring PLC chassis.
  • Explain what must be done prior to programming a PLC for the first time.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Ladder diagrams have been used in machine automation and process control applications for many years. Programmable logic controllers that are programmed to run ladder diagram programs have replaced virtually all hardwired controls. PLCs are cheaper and more versatile, and most importantly, they can be made to perform different functions by simply changing their programs. Once the PLC is installed and connected to the machine or process being controlled, it is almost ready to go. The last thing that needs to be done is to program the PLC to do its job. This course will detail how to enter a simple ladder diagram program into the memory of a programmable logic controller.

Learning Objectives

Programming Software
* Explain how to start the programming software on a PC.
Establishing Communications
* Discuss methods of connecting to a PLC.
* Review the software drivers needed to connect to a PLC.

PLC Memory Files
* Discuss the two main file types in PLC memory.

PLC I/O Addressing
* Identify PLC I/O addressing for Allen-Bradley PLCs.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Ladder diagrams have been used in machine automation and process control applications for many years. Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that are programmed to run ladder diagram programs have replaced virtually all hardwired controls. PLCs are cheaper and more versatile, and most importantly, they can be made to perform different functions by simply changing their programs. Once the PLC is installed and connected to the machine or process being controlled, it is almost ready to go. The last thing that needs to be done is to program the PLC to do its job. This course will detail how to enter a simple ladder diagram program into the memory of a PLC.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain how to clear PLC memory.
  • Describe how to add a rung to a PLC program.
  • Discuss how to add instructions to a rung.
  • Describe how to download a program written offline.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Ladder diagrams have been used to symbolically describe electrical control (PLC) systems for many decades. Early in the development of PLCs, it was decided to use ladder diagrams in their programming interface as well. This was done so that users of PLC systems would be able to see the program in a form that they were familiar with. Virtually all PLCs still use ladder diagrams. This course examines how PLCs use ladder diagrams to perform logic functions and the symbology involved.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe parts of electrical ladder diagrams.
  • Identify common symbols used on ladder diagrams.
  • Describe using multiple devices on a rung.
  • Explain rung numbering and cross-references.
  • Explain differences between PLC and hard-wired ladder scans.
  • Describe JMP and jump to subroutine (JSR) instructions.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Most programmable logic controller (PLC) system problems are hardware related, and most of those are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur and are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This course will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the different types of networks.
  • Describe the different indications on a PLC processor.
  • Explain the half-splitting method of problem solving.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) use not only decimal numbers but also other numbering systems. This course covers the most widely used numbering systems, including how to convert between different numbering systems and how those numbering systems are used by PLCs in typical applications. This course will also examine codes used for storing information in PLCs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify common numbering systems.
  • Discuss the positional numbering system.
    Interpret place values for binary numbers.
  • Describe how signed binary numbers are represented in PLC logic.
  • Explain binary to decimal number conversion.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) use not only decimal numbers but also other numbering systems. This course covers the most widely used numbering systems including how to convert between different numbering systems and how those numbering systems are used by PLCs in typical applications. This course will also examine codes used for storing information in PLCs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the octal numbering system.
  • Explain the conversion process between the octal, binary, and decimal numbering systems.
  • Identify the hexadecimal numbering system.
  • Explain the conversion process between the hexadecimal, octal, binary, and decimal numbering systems.
  • Discuss the common codes used in PLCs.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Installing and maintaining programmable logic controller (PLC) systems involves working with PLC equipment and hardware as well as communications and programming software. A major part of PLC work involves installing, debugging, and changing the program, or project, in a PLC processor. In order to do this work effectively, a thorough understanding of the system and the procedures needed for program entry, testing, and modification is necessary. This course will examine the techniques used initially to install and test a PLC program as well as how to make changes to PLC configurations and programs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain how to establish communication between a personal computer, or PC, and a PLC.
  • Describe the steps necessary to clear the memory of a PLC.
  • Explain how to install a project in a PLC.
  • Describe some common techniques used in testing and debugging operations.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Installing and maintaining programmable logic controller systems (PLCs) involves working with PLC equipment and hardware as well as communications and programming software. A major part of PLC work involves installing, debugging, and changing the program, or project, in a PLC processor. In order to do this work effectively, a thorough understanding of the system and the procedures needed for program entry, testing, and modification is necessary. This course will examine the techniques used initially to install and test a PLC program as well as how to make changes to PLC configurations and programs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify what should be done when a PLC’s hardware or software configuration is changed.
  • Illustrate how to use a PC hard drive for program backup.
  • Explain how to use the electrically erasable programmable read-only memory, or EEPROM, of
  • PLCs for program backup.
  • Describe the process for changing the PLC program while the system is in Program mode.
  • Explain the difference between online programming and offline programming.
  • Describe the process for changing the PLC program while the system is in Run mode.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have been very successful because they can effectively use bit or discrete I/O instructions to receive inputs from switches and other binary sensors and then drive output field devices such as motor contactors, solenoid valves, and indicators. But modern PLCs are able to do much more by using additional instructions to perform more sophisticated functions such as timing, counting, calculating, manipulating data, and even making decisions. This course will examine many of these “non-I/O” PLC instructions.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain word addresses.
  • Describe the simpler word instructions that are used to emulate timers and counters in ladder programs.
  • Describe the program control instructions that allow PLCs to make decisions.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have been very successful because they can effectively use bit or discrete I/O instructions to receive inputs from switches and other binary sensors and then drive output field devices such as motor contactors, solenoid valves, and indicators. But modern PLCs are able to do much more by using additional instructions to perform more sophisticated functions such as timing, counting, calculating, manipulating data, and even making decisions. This course will examine many of these “non-I/O” PLC instructions.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain comparison instructions.
  • Describe some of the different math instructions.
  • Explain registers and sequencers.
  • Discuss the different types of file instructions.
  • Explain the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) loop instruction.
  • Examine a real system example.

Duration: 1.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

The human-machine interface, or HMI, can be a very helpful aid to troubleshooting programming logic controller (PLC) hardware. By itself, however, the HMI cannot always provide information needed to troubleshoot a complex PLC system. Other aids must be used to help in hardware troubleshooting. This course will examine how to use the PLC itself, the HMI, and other test equipment to troubleshoot PLC hardware.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain how to isolate a problem to hardware vs. software and the network.
  • Identify troubleshooting aids and equipment indicators.
  • Explain how to use PLC software to support the troubleshooting process.
  • Identify I/O system organization.
  • Troubleshoot an I/O system.