Building Maintenance Training

Cooling

Cooling Courses

Building Maintenance Training

Duration: 0.39 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

The purpose of a direct expansion, or DX, system is to remove unwanted heat from a space or substance and transfer it to another space or substance. DX refrigeration systems are sometimes called mechanical refrigeration systems because they use mechanical components to remove and transfer heat. They are widely used in refrigerators, freezers, split systems, and package AC or rooftop units (RTUs). When troubleshooting a DX system, check the basics first – superheat in the suction line, subcooling in the liquid line, suction pressure, discharge (or head) pressure, and motor amps – to see if they are in their normal ranges for current conditions. A troubleshooting chart appropriate for your expansion device can provide guidance as to the possible issues. If you can’t pinpoint the problem, there may be an issue with one of the mechanical components. This course covers component issues that can affect the performance of a DX system, including issues with the compressor, compressor motor, expansion valve, refrigerant charge, liquid line, and lubricating oil system. This information, plus experience working around DX systems, will help you troubleshoot problems successfully and in a timely manner.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe how to troubleshoot compressor issues, including issues associated with the motor windings, low refrigerant charge, liquid-line restrictions, other restrictions, and the lube oil system
  • List problems that can occur with expansion valves, including those associated with the temperature-sensing bulb, valve obstruction, and valve sticking
  • Describe where liquid-line restrictions can occur and the associated symptoms

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

The purpose of a direct expansion, or DX, system is to remove unwanted heat from a space or substance and transfer it to another space or substance. DX refrigeration systems are sometimes called mechanical refrigeration systems because they use mechanical components to remove and transfer heat. They are widely used in refrigerators, freezers, split systems, and package AC or rooftop units (RTUs). DX systems use the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle in which a “refrigerant” alternately absorbs and rejects heat as it circulates through four main components – the compressor, condenser, expansion device, and evaporator. The temperature and pressure of the refrigerant can be checked at several locations to monitor system operations and help with troubleshooting efforts. This course discusses how system temperatures, pressures, superheat, and subcooling can be used to monitor the condition of a DX system, help troubleshoot problems, and charge refrigerant. When troubleshooting a DX system, make sure any troubleshooting chart you are using is appropriate for the expansion device, as symptoms differ for fixed orifice devices and TXVs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe what superheat and subcooling are and where they are measured in a DX system
  • Explain how superheat, subcooling, condensing pressure, and suction pressure readings can be used to troubleshoot issues in a DX system
  • Describe how a high heat load or undercharged system will show up in a DX system

Duration: 0.47 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Direct expansion, or DX, systems use the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle to remove heat from enclosed spaces and transfer it to the outside environment. The term “direct expansion” refers to the fact that the refrigerant expands to produce a cooling effect that is delivered directly to the conditioned air. DX systems are used in a variety of applications, including refrigerators, freezers, split systems, and package AC or rooftop units (RTUs). In the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, a “refrigerant” alternately absorbs and rejects heat as it circulates through the system. The system has four main components – a compressor, condenser, expansion device, and evaporator – and the refrigerant changes pressure, temperature, and phase as it circulates through these components. This course introduces the four main DX system components, including their purpose and design. It also describes several other common system components, temperature-sensing devices, several types of valves, pressure switches, and defrost controls.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the purpose and common designs for DX system components
  • Describe the purpose and location of common DX system modulating devices and controls
  • Describe the operation of the defrost controls on walk-in and reach-in freezers

Duration: 0.46 Hrs

Course Level: Advanced
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Did you know a constantly changing physical environment increases the chances of being injured? Carpentry is a skilled trade in which the primary work performed is the cutting, shaping and installation of building materials, primarily wood, during the construction of buildings and other structures. Carpentry typically occurs in a construction area. This interactive online course will cover some of the skills needed to practice good carpentry.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the purpose and common designs for DX system components
  • Describe the purpose and location of common DX system modulating devices and controls
  • Describe the operation of the defrost controls on walk-in and reach-in freezers

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Advanced
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Centrifugal chillers are used in medium- and large-sized buildings to provide comfort cooling. Many of them use the vapor compression refrigeration cycle to produce chilled water that is pumped to AHUs and FCUs located in various spaces around the building. Afterwards, the chilled water returns to the chiller unit, where it is re-cooled, and the process is repeated. Chiller systems are sized to handle the amount of heat that is generated inside a facility. However, cooling loads vary during the day as well as seasonally, and they can change over time as facility uses change. This can make chiller sizing challenging. An undersized system will not be able to be keep up and water temperatures will fluctuate, while an oversized system will cost more initially and not run efficiently. This course defines several chiller performance parameters, including capacity, delta T, and several efficiency factors, and it explains why they are important. It also lists items that should be checked during startups and capacity modulation techniques used during normal operations to ensure the safe efficient operation of chiller systems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define performance parameters for chiller systems, including capacity, delta T, kW/ton, EER (Energy Efficiency Ratio), and COP (Coefficient of Performance)
  • Describe techniques that can be used to adjust chiller capacity to meet varying cooling loads
  • List freeze protection and de-icing methods for cooling towers
  • Identify items that should be checked on chiller systems before startups

Duration: 0.31 Hrs

Course Level: Advanced
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Centrifugal chillers are used in medium- and large-sized buildings to provide comfort cooling. Many of them use the vapor compression refrigeration cycle, including centrifugal compressors and plate-and-frame or shell-and-tube heat exchangers, to produce chilled water that can be pumped to AHUs and FCUs located in different spaces throughout the building. At each AHU or FCU, the chilled water passes through a cooling coil while a fan blows air over the coil to produce cool air for the enclosed space. The chilled water then returns to the chiller unit, where it is re-cooled, and the process is repeated. Like other building systems, chiller systems require regular monitoring and maintenance in order to maintain their capacity and efficiency and avoid costly breakdowns and repairs. However, issues and breakdowns still occur. A good understanding of chiller design and operation is critical when troubleshooting a chiller system. This course discusses some common issues for centrifugal chillers and the troubleshooting steps and techniques that can be used to diagnose and determine the cause if a problem occurs.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the issues that can lead to chiller surge or cause a chiller to indicate “No Water Flow”
  • Discuss the purpose of a purge unit
  • Describe how moisture contamination, low load conditions, and low ambient temperatures affect chiller operations
  • Explain the term “chiller condenser approach”

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Advanced
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Due to the critical nature of server rooms and the dependence that virtually every organization has placed upon them, facility staff must recognize the importance of uninterrupted service from the computers within the server room. This online interactive course is intended for those responsible for maintaining computer room air conditioning systems. It will expand your knowledge of CRAC systems by identifying specific areas where attention should be focused to keep the systems running efficiently and reliably. We will also be discussing a few ancillary systems, which are also critical to the safe and successful operation of server rooms.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe how to properly maintain CRAC system components
  • Identify the correct ranges for computer room temperature and humidity
  • List and describe troubleshooting procedures for several common A/C problems
  • List the benefits of a preventive maintenance program

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This course is intended to be a primer to help any system operator or maintenance person to better understand some of the aspects and sometimes subtle nuances of computer room A/C systems, as well as the ancillary equipment and systems which normally support the A/C system. This online interactive course is by no means an in-depth study of computer room A/C systems, but strictly an introduction into the specialized world and nature of computer room A/C systems. By studying the fundamental information presented herein, you will gain enough information to be able to assist in keeping your company’s computers and servers fully, and reliably, operational.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Recall the ideal temperature and humidity ranges in a computer room
  • Compare and contrast the different types and manufacturers of computer room A/C systems
  • Describe the effects of humidity in a computer room and how to control it
  • Assess size and placement of an A/C system within a computer room
  • Explain why and how thermostats are used and placed in a computer room
  • Describe how to protect yourself and ensure data center safety
  • Describe the actions taken by a computer room A/C system in the event of a fire

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Did you know there are two types of cooling systems used in HVAC applications? Cooling systems remove heat from air – sensible heat from the gases in air and latent heat from the water vapor in air – in order to produce the desired temperatures and humidity levels in enclosed spaces. This interactive online course covers sensible heat and latent heat, British thermal units, the three laws of thermodynamics, and the cooling equipment that is used in HVAC systems.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define “British Thermal Unit,” or “BTU”
  • Describe the difference between Sensible Heat and Latent Heat
  • Define “Enthalpy”
  • List the three Laws of Thermodynamics
  • Describe various types of cooling equipment

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Cooling systems remove heat from building air in order to produce the desired temperatures and humidity levels in enclosed spaces. These electro-mechanical systems require routine inspections and maintenance to keep them functioning properly. This interactive online course covers how to inspect and maintain cooling system drive belts, and best practices for greasing bearings and cleaning of cooling system coils.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe how to inspect and maintain cooling system drive belts
  • Describe best practices for greasing bearings
  • Describe how regular cleaning of cooling system coils improves thermal energy transfer

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

How do you properly cool a building? Cooling systems are used to cool and condition the air in rooms and building. To do this, they must remove heat from the air. How much heat needs to be removed to reach the desired temperature? What about humidity – the amount of water vapor in the air? Humidity affects how much heat we feel so it must also be addressed. This interactive online course will address these and other cooling system-related topics and issues.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • State the First Law of Thermodynamics
  • Understand that Total Cooling must take into account Sensible Heat and Latent Heat
  • Identify that a thermometer measures sensible heat
  • Identify that a sling psychrometer measures relative humidity
  • Define “Enthalpy” and identify the properties of air that influence enthalpy

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

“Who turned down the thermostat? Why is it so cold in here?” Individuals who respond to hot and cold calls made by uncomfortable building occupants must have a certain set of skills, including a thorough understanding of the heating/cooling system in question, training in problem-solving or troubleshooting techniques, and people skills. This interactive online course will discuss how to methodically approach cooling system-related complaints and problems, as well as desirable personality traits and useful problem-solving techniques for effective customer service representatives.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe basic hot and cold call troubleshooting methods
  • Describe desirable customer service
  • Identify the steps taken while troubleshooting customer calls