Building Maintenance Training

Electrical

Electrical Courses

Building Maintenance Training

Duration: 0.45 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Improper actions or conditions encountered with electrical devices and components could result in serious unsafe conditions, including fire hazards, electrical shock and even death. This course reviews how to avoid unsafe conditions while operating and resetting GFCI receptacles and while replacing ballasts, light switches, and electrical receptacles. This course should be used by persons working outside the U.S.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the steps to diagnose and troubleshoot a bad fuse
  • Describe how a GFCI (RCD) works
  • Identify hot, neutral, and ground electrical wiring
  • Identify the hazards of working energized
  • Indicate the first step in disconnecting a light switch for replacement
  • Select the correct wiring configuration when replacing an electrical receptacle

Duration: 0.39 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Understanding some of the fundamental concepts of electrical circuits is vital to being able to operate and troubleshoot electrical systems. This course covers some basic electrical terminology, the sources of electricity, circuit overcurrent protection, and methods for measuring electricity. Electric current is driven by an electric potential difference, or voltage. Voltage sources include generators, batteries, and photovoltaic sources. Conductors are materials which allow the free flow of electricity and connect all other components in an electrical circuit. Insulators are materials which block the flow of electricity. The flow of electricity within a circuit needs to be properly contained. There is a need for protection from the dangers of overcurrent conditions in circuits. This protection is provided by fuses and circuit breakers. Electrical systems should also be grounded and bonded. A multimeter is a device that can be used to measure voltage, current, and resistance. Permanently-mounted power meters measure the amount of power entering a building and how it is consumed throughout the building.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe common electrical terms associated with electricity and distribution systems.
  • Describe electrical storage devices
  • Explain methods related to overcurrent protection and grounding
  • List important measurements needed when operating around electrical circuits

Duration: 0.40 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Electrical power is essential to the operation of a modern building. This power is generated by a utility company and is delivered to buildings through transmission lines. Electromagnetic induction of alternating current is the principle which enables generators to create electricity, transformers to change its voltage for transmission, and motors to convert electricity back to mechanical energy. At the building, electrical power is manipulated, distributed, and controlled in various ways before being actually “consumed” at an end load. Overcurrent in electric circuits is prevented by fuses and circuit breakers. GFCIs and AFCIs use solid state circuitry to provide an additional layer of circuit protection. Different types of lighting require different types of controls. Triacs are used in dimmers for incandescent lights, ballasts are required for fluorescent lamps, and LED drivers are used to power LED lighting. This module covers the steps and components that are typically used to control the distribution and control of electrical power throughout a building.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe how AC power is created
  • Describe components associated with electrical distribution
  • List three components that provide electrical circuit protection
  • Describe the uses of dimmer switches, fluorescent ballasts, and LED lighting power supplies

Duration: 0.37 Hrs

Course Level: Advanced
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady, Responsive

Electrical power is the lifeblood of a modern building. It provides light, heating, cooling, and power for many electrical devices. Although there is great value in electrical power, it has shortcomings. If it is not handled properly, it represents a significant direct health hazard in the form of electrocution. Additionally, improper installation of wiring or electrical equipment has been the source of countless fires. For these reasons, several organizations have set up guidelines and regulations regarding the installation and use of electrical equipment. One of the most significant set of regulations is the NEC, or National Electric Code. This set of guidelines was first developed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) in 1897, and has been updated every three years since then. Code-enforcement agencies may choose to enforce the current NEC codes, older editions of it, or alternate versions that incorporate local modifications. Designers and electricians should verify the codes and editions in force and consult authorities having jurisdiction (AHJ) regarding their interpretations of ambiguous or conflicting requirements. This module describes how power is delivered to and distributed throughout a building. It also covers some of the major code issues governing this process.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe some code requirements for electrical panels and circuit breakers
  • Describe the purpose of branch circuit conductors, grounding, and grounding-type receptacles
  • List the required locations and/or clearances for furnace disconnects, fire alarm disconnects, working spaces around electrical equipment, and HVAC equipment service outlets
  • Identify code requirements for splices, flexible cords, conduits, and EMT
  • Describe the recommended method for cutting EMT
  • List code requirements for battery backup exit lighting, emergency power supplies, and storage battery room ventilation

Duration: 0.45 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Improper actions or conditions encountered with electrical devices and components could result in serious unsafe conditions, including fire hazards, electrical shock and even death. This course reviews how to avoid unsafe conditions while operating and resetting GFCI receptacles and while replacing ballasts, light switches, and electrical receptacles. This course should be used by persons working outside the U.S.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the steps to diagnose and troubleshoot a bad fuse
  • Describe how a GFCI (RCD) works
  • Identify hot, neutral, and ground electrical wiring
  • Identify the hazards of working energized
  • Indicate the first step in disconnecting a light switch for replacement
  • Select the correct wiring configuration when replacing an electrical receptacle

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

In this interactive online course, you’ll learn basic electrical troubleshooting concepts. You’ll learn the difference between a step-up and a step-down transformer, how to test for unbalanced loads and blown fuses, and how to tell if the insulation on a wire is adequate so it doesn’t present a hazard. You’ll be introduced to tools such as a clamp-on ammeter, megohmmeter and voltmeter used in the practice of electrical troubleshooting. The information covered in this course can be applied at your facility for safe work on large and small electrical components.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the capabilities of multimeter
  • Describe the use of clamp ammeters, megohmeters and non-contact temperature sensors for troubleshooting
  • List some tests that can be used to troubleshoot motors
  • Describe troubleshooting motor controllers and fuses
  • Describe the purpose of a transformer

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Electricity is an essential element of the workplace. It provides light, heat, motive power and communications, but it is also dangerous. The need to constantly maintain, repair and upgrade electrical equipment means that employees will sometimes be in close vicinity to electricity and therefore exposed to some risk. This interactive online course covers the dangers of an arc flash and the effects of different current flows on the body. It describes the importance of a lockout tagout program and the goal of the NFPA 70E standard.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the dangers of an arc flash
  • Describe the goal of the NFPA 70E standard
  • Describe the basics of a lockout tagout program
  • Describe the effects of different current flows on the body

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Electricity is an essential element of the workplace. It provides light, heat, motive power, and communications, but it is also dangerous. The need to continually maintain, repair, and upgrade electrical equipment means that employees will sometimes be in close vicinity to electricity and therefore exposed to some risk. This interactive online course explains the dangers of an arc flash and how to protect against an arc flash, as well as the basic principles of a lockout tagout program.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • State the dangers of an arc flash
  • Describe how to protect against arc flash
  • Explain the need for a lockout tagout program
  • Describe the basic principles of a lockout tagout program

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Do you know the difference between current and voltage? This course on basic electrical theory will equip you with the knowledge you need to handle various calculations involving electrical circuits, both AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current). You will learn how to calculate voltage and electrical power in a circuit using Ohm’s Law and Watt’s Law. In this interactive online course, we’ll discuss how to determine the electrical resistance for the wiring in a circuit and the size power unit that will be needed to drive a piece of equipment. Finally, you’ll learn the difference between single- and three-phase power.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define the terms voltage, current and resistance
  • Identify Ohm’s law
  • Solve for current flow given the voltage and resistance of a circuit
  • Identify Watt’s law
  • Define how to calculate power
  • Explain the difference between single and three phase AC power

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

An electrical circuit is a conductive path through which electrical current can flow. In this interactive online course on Electrical Architecture, you’ll gain a knowledge of technical requirements on individual electric components, equipment, and entire electrical systems. Key principles covered in this course include switch circuit arrangements, dedicated vs. shared circuits, circuit voltages, heater contactors, and the basics of electrical wiring.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List and describe the purpose of the key components that make up a circuit
  • Describe different transformer types and define common transformer terminology, such as delta, wye, primary, and secondary
  • Differentiate between “dedicated” and “shared” circuits
  • Determine the purpose of conductors based on the color of the insulated jacket
  • Determine the appropriate wire gauge based on the circuit amperage rating

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

An understanding of basic electrical theory and mathematics is valuable for all electrical work. In this interactive online course, you’ll learn critical principles of Electrical Theory, and the Mathematics involved in performing calculations to solve electrical circuit parameters, such as voltage, amperage, resistance and power. This course will introduce you to Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law, Kirchoff’s Law, and Faraday’s Law.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Recall the basic principles of electrical theory
  • Given a formula, solve for kilowatts
  • Select the proper symbolism in reference to Ohms and Watts law calculations
  • Recall the basic principles of Ohm’s Law

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Fundamental
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Volts, ohms and amps are important characteristics of all electrical circuits. There are dedicated instruments for measuring each of these quantities, but it more is common to use a single meter that is capable of measuring all three. This interactive online course covers how to take voltage, amperage, and resistance measurements, as well as the precautions to take when making such electrical measurements.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe a digital multimeter
  • Describe how to make a voltage measurement
  • Describe how to make an amperage measurement
  • Describe how make a resistance measurement
  • List precautions to be taken when making electrical measurements