Electrical Skills

Electrical Wiring

Electrical Wiring Courses

Electrical Skills

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English

This is a two-part course which covers the 2020 NEC Changes. Part One covers the changes in Articles 242 and 250 of the National Electrical Code®. The new article 242 contains the requirements for overvoltage, or surge, protection. Article 250 covers the grounding and bonding of systems and equipment. Notable changes include the creation of Article 242 and deletion of Article 280 and 285, a new section addressing the bonding of equipment on the line side of the service, specific requirements for aluminum conductors, limiting the role of rebar in the grounding electrode system, fixing an error about the sizing of bonding jumpers, reducing the identification requirements for equipment ground conductors, and providing relief for the sizing of equipment grounding conductors in certain applications.

Part Two covers the changes in Articles 300, 310, 311, 312, and 314 of the National Electrical Code®. Article 300 contains general requirements for wiring methods. Article 310 covers conductors rated 2,000V and less. New Article 311 covers conductors rated more than 2,000V. Article 312 covers cabinets, cutout boxes, and meter socket enclosures. Article 314 covers outlet, device, pull, and junction boxes; conduit bodies; fittings; and handhole enclosures. Notable changes include clarifying which fittings may be concealed, harmonizing building code and electrical code rules for stair enclosures, a complete rewrite of Article 310, a new article 311, specific rules for cable trays and enclosures used together, and major changes for boxes in the ceilings of dwelling units.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain why Articles 280 and 285 were combined into Article 242
  • Describe the evolution of Article 250 since 2008
  • Identify some of the system grounding configurations that are allowed in the NEC
  • Explain why Article 310 was rewritten and explain the new requirements for Article 311
  • List the requirements for conductors entering enclosures from a cable tray
  • Discuss the rules for equipment in panelboard cabinets

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video, MobileReady

An electrical circuit is a conductive path through which electrical current can flow. In this interactive online course on Electrical Architecture, you’ll gain a knowledge of technical requirements on individual electric components, equipment, and entire electrical systems. Key principles covered in this course include switch circuit arrangements, dedicated vs. shared circuits, circuit voltages, heater contactors, and the basics of electrical wiring.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List and describe the purpose of the key components that make up a circuit
  • Describe different transformer types and define common transformer terminology, such as delta, wye, primary, and secondary
  • Differentiate between “dedicated” and “shared” circuits
  • Determine the purpose of conductors based on the color of the insulated jacket
  • Determine the appropriate wire gauge based on the circuit amperage rating

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

One of the greatest benefits of electricity is its ability to transfer energy from where it is generated to where it is needed. Electrical wires, cables and cords are used to accomplish the transfer. Electrical wiring consists of a conductive material such as copper surrounded by an insulating material such as thermoplastic. The primary dangers associated with the distribution of electric power are electrocution and the generation of heat. These hazards must be considered when laying out and connecting all types of wiring.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define electricity
  • List the major dangers of electricity
  • List the factors which affect the resistance of a wire
  • Differentiate between the terms wire, cable, and cord
  • Explain the AWG wire sizing system
  • Describe the factors that go into selecting an insulation material
  • Describe the purpose of a raceway
  • Describe the correct and incorrect uses of flexible cords

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

Electric Lighting is a course designed to familiarize participants with various types of lamps and lighting fixtures and how install them. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain how the human eye sees and describe the characteristics of light. They should also be able to compare and contrast various types of lamps, and they should be able to explain how to install various types of light fixtures.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain how the human eye works.
  • Describe the characteristics of light.
  • Recognize the different kinds of lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Recognize the different kinds of incandescent lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Recognize the different kinds of fluorescent lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Recognize the different kinds of high intensity discharge (HID) lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Properly select and install lamps into lighting fixtures.
  • Recognize and install various types of light fixtures.
  • Recognize and install surface-mounted fixtures.
  • Recognize and install recessed fixtures.
  • Recognize and install suspended fixtures.
  • Recognize and install track-mounted fixtures.
  • Electrically connect various types of lighting fixtures.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Cable Tray is a course designed to familiarize participants with cable tray components and installation techniques. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify the types of sections and the types of fittings used in cable tray assemblies, explain how cable tray is supported, and explain how cable tray sections are spliced. They should also be able to size cable tray for specific numbers and types of conductors.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the sections used in cable tray assembly.
  • Describe the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for cable tray construction.
  • Select the proper cable tray sections for specific applications.
  • Identify cable tray sections on working drawings.
  • Describe the effects of improper tray loading.
  • Describe the connectors, barrier strips, and covers used in cable tray assemblies.
  • Select the proper cable tray fittings for the situation.
  • Identify cable tray fittings on working drawings.
  • Describe the splice plates used in cable tray assembly.
  • Select the proper cable tray fittings for the situations.
  • Explain the methods used to hang and secure cable tray.
  • Describe where splices in straight tray sections should be located.
  • Describe a method used to fabricate an offset in cable tray.
  • Describe the NEC® requirements for cable tray installation and grounding.
  • Select the required fittings to ensure equipment-grounding continuity in cable tray systems.
  • Size cable tray for the number and types of conductors contained in the system.
  • Describe the NEC® requirements for cable tray conductors.
  • Describe the general requirements for pulling cable in tray systems.
  • Describe how cable is supported in vertical tray.
  • Describe how cable exits cable tray.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

This course is designed to familiarize participants with wiring devices and wiring techniques used at commercial and industrial sites. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify various types of switches, enclosures, control devices, and receptacles. They should also be able to describe basic techniques for planning and installing branch circuits, mounting boxes, and working with conductors.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify and state the functions of basic types of switches.
  • Describe National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) classifications for switches and enclosures.
  • Describe the basic operation of a relay.
  • Describe the basic operation of a limit switch.
  • Describe basic types of switchgear.
  • Describe common types of receptacles.
  • Identify and describe the operation of a ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacle.
  • Describe general steps involved in planning and installing a branch circuit.
  • Describe National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements relating to box mounting procedures.
  • Describe a procedure for stripping, bending, and splicing conductors during the installation of a single-pole switch.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

Boxes and Fittings is a course designed to familiarize participants with various types of boxes and fittings used in electrical installations. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify different types of boxes and explain how to properly size outlet boxes, pull boxes, and junction boxes. They should also be able to identify different types of couplings, locknuts, and bushings, and explain what seal-off fittings are and how they are installed. In addition, they should be able to describe the three classes of hazardous locations that are identified in the National Electrical Code® (NEC®) and describe requirements for safely installing boxes and fittings in hazardous locations.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe different types of boxes that are used in electrical installations and typical applications for which each type is appropriate.
  • Describe how to properly size outlet boxes, pull boxes, and junction boxes.
  • Describe concerns that are associated with installing pull boxes and junction boxes.
  • Describe types of couplings that are used to connect different types of conduit in electrical installations.
  • Describe different types of locknuts and bushings that are used in electrical installations.
  • Describe what seal-off fittings are and explain how they are installed.
  • Describe environmental conditions and equipment requirements that are associated with installing boxes and fittings in damp or wet locations.
  • Describe the conditions that make an area a “hazardous location” for electrical installations.
  • Describe the three classes of hazardous locations that are identified in the NEC®.
  • Describe requirements for safely installing boxes and fittings in hazardous locations.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

Installation of Electric Services is a course designed to familiarize participants with considerations associated with installing a commercial or industrial electric service. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe various types of electric services for commercial and industrial installations, and they should be able to identify and describe the main components of those services. They should also be able to explain how to select and install equipment for a single-phase service and a three-phase service.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the essential elements of an alternating current (AC) electrical system.
  • Describe various types of electrical services for commercial and industrial installations.
  • Describe single-phase service connections.
  • Describe wye-connected and delta-connected three-phase services.
  • Describe the function of each part of a typical electric service.
  • Read electrical blueprints and diagrams describing service installations.
  • Explain the role of the National Electrical Code (NEC) in service installations.
  • Calculate and select service entrance equipment.
  • Identify the circuit loads, number of circuits required, and installation requirements for distribution panels.
  • Explain the types and purposes of service grounding.
  • Identify the main difference between installing a single-phase service and installing a three-phase service.
  • Describe considerations associated with installing panelboards.
  • Install a panelboard.
  • Identify various types of safety switches.
  • Install a safety switch.
  • Describe the basic requirements of a maintenance program for electrical panelboards and switches.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic construction and installation of electrical cables and conductors. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the basic construction of cables and conductors, and describe how conductors are classified and rated. They should also be able to describe factors that affect the installation of a conductor for a specific application, and describe how to make splices and terminations.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the basic construction of conductors.
  • Describe how the physical characteristics of a conductor’s wires affect how the conductor is classified and rated.
  • Describe how the physical characteristics of a conductor’s insulation affect how the conductor is classified and rated.
  • Describe factors that determine the current requirements of a circuit.
  • Describe factors that determine the voltage requirements of a circuit.
  • Describe characteristics in an environment that affect the type of conductor that should be installed.
  • Explain how environmental temperatures affect the type of conductor that should be installed.
  • Describe factors that should be considered when a mechanical connector is selected.
  • Describe factors that should be considered when replacement insulation is selected.
  • Describe how to make a splice.
  • Describe how to make a termination.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic concepts of conduit and conduit fittings, and typical methods of cutting, bending, and installing conduit. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the basic types of metallic and nonmetallic conduit, describe common types of conduit fittings, and describe procedures for cutting, bending, and installing metallic and non-metallic conduit.

Learning Objectives

  • Define terms that are commonly used to describe conduit and conduit installations.
  • Describe common types of metallic conduit.
  • Describe common types of nonmetallic conduit.
  • Describe types of couplings that are used to connect conduit in a straight line.
  • Describe types of fittings that are used to change the direction of a conduit run.
  • Describe types of fittings that are used to secure conduit when it is installed.
  • Describe a method for cutting rigid types of metal conduit.
  • Describe a method for cutting flexible types of metal conduit.
  • Describe methods for cutting nonmetallic conduit.
  • Describe different types of conduit bends and explain where they might be used in an installation.
  • Explain how bends affect conduit measurements.
  • Describe how rigid-type metal conduit can be bent.
  • Describe how rigid PVC can be bent.
  • Describe tasks associated with terminating conduit to an electrical control box.
  • Describe how conductors can be installed in conduit.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

This course is designed to familiarize participants with common types of hardware and accessories used in making electrical splices and terminations, and how to prepare for and make various types of connections. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify basic types of terminals, connectors, tools, and materials used in making splices and terminations, and describe the applications for which they are suitable. They should also be able to describe how to make some common types of electrical splices and conductor terminations.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and describe basic types of electrical wiring.
  • Identify types of conductor terminals and connectors and describe the applications for which they are suitable.
  • Identify and describe tools and materials typically used in making conductor splices and terminations.
  • Identify the basic requirements for a good electrical connection.
  • Describe how to make some common types of splices and identify the applications for which each type of splice is suitable.
  • Identify requirements for terminating conductors in enclosures.
  • Describe how to make up connections to a terminal box on a three-phase alternating current (AC) motor.

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Compatibility: Audio, Video

This course is designed to familiarize participants with various types of raceways used to house electrical wiring. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe various types of raceways, including conduit, wireways, and cable trays. They should also be able to describe procedures for installing raceways in various types of environments.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and describe types of conduit commonly used as raceways.
  • Identify and describe fittings used with conduit.
  • Identify and describe common types of supports used with conduit.
  • Describe typical boxes used with raceways.
  • Describe common fittings used to join conduit to boxes.
  • Describe how to make a conduit-to-box connection.
  • Define the term “wireway” and describe common types of wireways.
  • Identify and describe fittings used with wireways.
  • Identify and describe typical wireway supports.
  • Describe surface metal raceways.
  • Describe plug mold multi-outlet raceways.
  • Describe underfloor raceways.
  • Describe cellular metal floor raceways and cellular concrete floor raceways.
  • State the function of cable trays and identify two basic forms of cable trays.
  • Describe typical cable tray fittings and cable tray supports.
  • Describe proper and safe methods for storing raceways.
  • Describe proper and safe methods for handling raceways.
  • Define the term “duct.”
  • Identify and describe typical methods that can be used to install underground cable.
  • Describe procedures for installing raceways and boxes in a metal stud environment.
  • Describe procedures for installing raceways and boxes in a wood frame environment.
  • Describe procedures for installing raceways in a steel environment.
  • Describe procedures for installing raceways and boxes in a drywall surface mount environment.