Electrical Skills

National Electric Code

National Electric Code Courses

Electrical Skills

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Photovoltaic (PV) systems use the energy from the sun to generate electricity. This electricity can be used to power small, rooftop systems to large-scale utility operations and everything in between. This interactive, online course is designed to give you an overview of Article 690 Solar Photovoltaic Systems, and Article 705, Interconnected Electrical Power Production Sources of the 2020 National Electrical Code® (NEC®). Notable changes in the articles for photovoltaic systems and interconnected electric power production sources include changes to PV overcurrent protection, disconnecting means, and language for interconnection of electric power production sources.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List the three ways voltage is calculated for PV systems
  • Identify how current is calculated for different PV system circuits
  • Identify where overcurrent protection is required in PV system circuits
  • Recognize the rules for multiconductor cables in PV system circuits
  • Size equipment grounding conductors for DC and AC circuits in PV systems
  • Recognize the marking requirements for PV systems
  • Recognize the marking requirements for buildings with PV power sources
  • Identify the rules for supply side source connections
  • Identify the requirements for power control systems
  • List the basic requirements for power source disconnecting means
  • Identify circuit sizing and overcurrent protection requirements for power source circuits
  • Identify basic elements of micro grids

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Did you know the NEC® 2020 has new regulations for using your electric vehicle as a power source? This interactive online course covers the changes in Articles 600 through 695 of the National Electrical Code®, other than Articles 690 and 691 (PV systems). Notable changes include increasing the requirement for selective coordination for elevators; multiple changes addressing electric vehicles used as a power source; further restrictions on underfloor wiring in ITE rooms; listing, inspection, and GFCI protection requirements for pools and bodies of water, and reduced protection requirements for fire pump wiring.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define host sign, retrofit kit general use, retrofit kit science specific, and subassembly
  • Recall the instances in which overcurrent devices for elevators must be selectively coordinated
  • Describe the listing, inspection, and GFCI protection requirements for pools and bodies of water
  • Recall GFPE settings given various instances
  • Identify the cords, conductors, and cables that are allowed in under floor spaces of IT equipment rooms
  • Discuss the reduced protection requirements for fire pump wiring

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

The National Electrical code® (NEC®) is updated every three years, so it is important that contractors, electrical professionals and safety professionals stay updated on these changes. This interactive, online course covers the changes in Articles 500 through 590 of the National Electrical Code®. Notable changes are addressing the use of lasers in hazardous locations; clarifying the GFCI requirements throughout Chapter 5; addressing the applicability of Article 517’s requirements; major changes for marinas, boatyards, and similar locations; and new requirements for large, temporary wiring installations.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Name the permitted uses of type P cables
  • List the areas of healthcare facilities that are not required to comply with Part II of Article 517
  • Recall when a leakage current measuring device is required for marinas and boatyards
  • Recognize when GFCI protection is required
  • Determine when a combustible gas detection system may be used
  • Name the type of radiation the 2020 NEC® addresses on the dangers of ignition
  • Recognize the approved applications and limitations of TC-ER-HL cable
  • Describe the underground wiring requirements for commercial garages
  • List the types of buildings, structures and conductors covered under Article 545
  • State the requirement for underground equipment grounding conductors in agricultural buildings that are regulated by Article 547
  • State the receptacle requirements for RV sites and marinas
  • Identify when current limiting overcurrent devices are required for temporary installations

Duration: 2.00 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Changes related to load calculations in the 2020 NEC® will place a new emphasis on maintaining equipment. Since reconditioned equipment requirements are completely new to the NEC®, we’ll show you how, and you’ll see how some changes related to these calculations will have a drastic effect on services sizes. This interactive online course will review various wiring and protection related changes to the 2020 NEC®. Included will be a review of requirements associated with arc fault protection, receptacle locations, feeders, load calculations, and overcurrent protection.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the function of and changes related to Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCI’s)
  • Identify new requirements associated with AFCI and Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) reconditioning
  • Discuss the requirement concerning common supply equipment and multiple feeders
  • Describe the revised requirements associated with dwelling unit receptacle outlets at countertops, peninsulas, work surfaces, wall spaces, outdoors, basements, garages and accessory buildings
  • Examine the changes associated with receptacles in area where equipment requires servicing
  • Identify the revision concerning lighting outlets and wall mounted control devices
  • Discuss the expanded requirements concerning feeders, including temporarily installed feeders
  • Explain the load calculation revisions for both dwelling and non-dwelling units
  • Examine the expanded allowances for outdoor feeders and common supply equipment
  • Explain the expansion of barriers associated with service equipment
  • Describe the new requirement for dwelling unit surge protection
  • Identify the changes to the service disconnect rules
  • Identify new requirements associated with overcurrent device reconditioning
  • Discuss changes made to arc-energy reduction requirements

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Believe it or not, GFCI protection first appeared in the 1962 edition of the NEC®, where it applied to underwater lighting for swimming pools. Many changes have been made to the Code since then. This interactive online course will help walk you through some of the most recent changes concerning this live safety device, as well as review other changes associated with branch circuits. We will address changes to Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection, noting updates to Articles 100, 200, and 210.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define terms located in Article 100
  • Recall the changes to Article 200 Use and
  • Identification of Grounded Conductors
  • Describe the revisions to Sections 200.9 Means of Identification of Terminals and 200.10(B)
  • Identification of Terminals for Receptacles, Plugs and Connectors concerning silver identification
  • Recall the changes to Article 210 Branch Circuits
  • Recall the revisions to Section 210.8(A) Dwelling Unit Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection for Personnel and Section 210.8(B) Other Than Dwelling Unit GFCI Protection for Personnel
  • Describe new Section 210.8(F) Outdoor Outlets and Section 210.8(E) Equipment Requiring Servicing and its correlation with Section 210.63

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

The National Electrical Code® Style Manual has been in existence since 1969 and has been updated nine times since its inception. There was quite a bit of activity in the 2020 NEC® concerning definitions. In this interactive online course, we will cover new definitions added, and existing definitions that have been revised or relocated in the 2020 NEC®. We will also review new and revised requirements for equipment installation, labeling, marking and working space.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the NEC Style Manual including the rules for definition placement
  • Discuss new Part III of Article 100 Definitions
  • Describe the new definitions related to dormitory units, island mode, laundry area and reconditioned
  • Describe the revisions to existing definitions of accessible, available fault current, equipment grounding conductor, equipotential plane and labeled
  • Identify the revision at Section 110. Conductors related to copper clad aluminum, Section 110.14(D) Terminal Connection Torque, Section 110.22(A) Identification of Disconnecting Means, and Section 110.24(A) Field Marking Available Fault Current
  • Recognize the revisions to under 1000 volt working space requirements in Sections 110.26(A)(3), 110.26(C)(2) and 110.26(D) and to over 1000 volt working space requirements in Sections 110.31(A)(4) and 110.32; and
  • Explain new Section 110.12 Cables and Conductors and Section 110.21(A)(2) Reconditioned Equipment

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This course will briefly discuss the 2020 implementation of the National Fire Protection Association® (NFPA®) new revision process for considering changes to the National Electrical Code® (NEC®). You will be introduced to the 2020 NEC® new articles covering Overvoltage Protection, Medium Voltage (MV) Cable, and Type P Cable. We’ll show you how and where the NFPA® has reorganized and relocated articles to expand on Manufactured Buildings and Relocatable Structures. Additionally, we’ll review the two articles that were merged into one to cover Marinas, Boatyards, Floating Buildings and Commercial and Noncommercial Docking Facilities. And finally, we’ll summarize the changes made to Article 800 General Requirements for Communications Systems.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the process for revising the NEC®
  • Identify the new 2020 NEC® Articles
  • Identify the new Article 242 Overvoltage Protection
  • Identify the new title and scope of Article 311 Medium Voltage Cable
  • Identify the new title and scope of Article 337 Type P Cable
  • Describe the changes to Article 545 Manufactured Buildings and Relocatable Structures
  • Discuss the changes to Article 555 Marinas, Boatyards, Floating Buildings, and Commercial and Noncommercial Docking Facilities
  • Identify the new title and scope of Article 800 General Requirements for Communications Systems

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This interactive online course covers the changes in Articles 300, 310, 311, 312, and 314 of the National Electrical Code®. Article 300 contains general requirements for wiring methods. Article 310 covers conductors rated 2,000V and less. New Article 311 covers conductors rated more than 2,000V. Article 312 covers cabinets, cutout boxes, and meter socket enclosures. Article 314 covers outlet, device, pull, and junction boxes; conduit bodies; fittings; and handhole enclosures. Notable changes include clarifying which fittings may be concealed, harmonizing building code and electrical code rules for stair enclosures, a complete rewrite of Article 310, a new article 311, specific rules for cable trays and enclosures used together, and major changes for boxes in the ceilings of dwelling units.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Recall the rules for tapping parallel conductors
  • Identify which fittings are allowed for protecting conductors
  • Recall the rules for sealing raceways exposed to different temperatures
  • Identify which raceway fittings are allowed, and which types can be concealed
  • State the requirements for penetrating a stair enclosure
  • Explain why Article 310 was rewritten and explain the new requirements for Article 311
  • List the requirements for conductors entering enclosures from a cable tray
  • Discuss the rules for equipment in panelboard cabinets
  • Identify the new rules for box fill
  • Explain the rules for conduit pendants
  • Determine when ceiling fan boxes are required in dwelling units

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This interactive online course covers the changes in Articles 242 and 250 of the National Electrical Code®. The new article 242 contains the requirements for overvoltage, or surge, protection. Article 250 covers the grounding and bonding of systems and equipment. Notable changes include the creation of Article 242 and deletion of Article 280 and 285, a new section addressing the bonding of equipment on the line side of the service, specific requirements for aluminum conductors, limiting the role of rebar in the grounding electrode system, fixing an error about the sizing of bonding jumpers, reducing the identification requirements for equipment ground conductors, and providing relief for the sizing of equipment grounding conductors in certain applications.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain why Articles 280 and 285 were combined into Article 242
  • Describe the evolution of Article 250 since 2008
  • Identify some of the system grounding configurations that are allowed in the NEC
  • Identify the increased allowances and requirements for aluminum conductors
  • Explain the clarifications that were made for grounding separately derived systems
  • Explain the use of rebar as a connection point
  • Describe the use of metal enclosures as equipment grounding conductors
  • List the allowances for re-identifying the equipment grounding conductors
  • Identify the allowance for sizing equipment grounding conductors when ungrounded conductors have been increased in size

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This course covers the changes in Articles 700, 702, 706, 725, 770 and Chapter 8 of the National Electrical Code®. Article 700 contains the requirements for emergency systems. Article 701 covers optional standby systems. Article 706 covers energy storage systems. Article 725 covers Class 1, 2, and 3 remote-control, signaling, and power-limited circuits. Chapter 8 covers communications systems. Notable changes include clarification of the requirements for transfer equipment, reduced requirements for unit equipment used for emergency lighting, several new requirements for energy storage systems, and the consolidation of several rules in Chapter 8.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Recall the rules for sizing and emergency generator.
  • Identify the type of transfer switches that are not allowed for emergency systems.
  • Recall the fire rating for a listed fire resistive cable system used in an emergency system.
  • List the requirements of a DC micro grid if it’s used as a power source.
  • List the new requirements for transfer equipment. Identify how and whom is to install and maintain energy storage systems.
  • Define cable bundle in Article 725.
  • Recall the requirements for determining the ampacity of class two and class three cables and
  • Recognize the global changes that were made in chapter eight for communication circuits.

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This course covers the changes in Articles 404, 406, 408, and 410 of the National Electrical Code®. Articles 404 and 406 contain the requirements for switches and receptacles. Article 408 covers panelboards, switchboards, and switchgear. Article 410 covers luminaires, lampholders, and lamps. Notable changes include updating the rules for switches, including listing requirements, new prohibited locations for receptacles, expansion of tamper-resistant receptacle requirements, new marking requirements for panelboards, switchboards, and switchgear, and addressing the unique needs of horticultural lighting.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Describe the permitted use and ratings of switches
  • State the requirements when replacing automatically controlled receptacles
  • Recall the rules for receptacles under sinks
  • Note the approved placement of receptacles in bathrooms
  • List the rating of nonlocking receptacles that must be tamper resistant if installed in dormitory units
  • List the locations requiring tamper resistant receptacles
  • Recognize when panelboards must be field labeled
  • Recall the circumstances in which recessed luminaires can be used to access junction boxes
  • Locate the part of the code that covers horticultural lighting

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This course covers the changes in Articles 411, 422, 424, 430, 440, 445, 450 and 480 of the National Electrical Code®. Article 411 contains the requirements for low voltage lighting. Article 422 covers appliances. Article 424 covers fixed electric space-heating equipment. Article 430 covers motors and their controllers. Article 314 covers air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. Article 445 contains the requirements for generators. Article 450 covers transformers. Article 480 covers storage batteries. Notable changes include expanding the GFCI requirements for specific appliances, addressing new overload protection options for certain motors, new listing requirements for generators, and added disconnecting means requirements for generators and batteries.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss when an assembly of listed parts are allowed for low-voltage lighting.
  • List the appliances that require GFCI protection if they’re rated 150 volts or less to ground and 60 amps or less.
  • Recall the voltage threshold for appliances that require listing.
  • Indicate when a thermostat can be used as a disconnecting means.
  • Define electronically protected.
  • Determine if a stationary generator should be listed or field labeled.
  • Recall the requirements of emergency shutdown devices for generators and battery systems at dwelling units.

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

This interactive online course covers the changes in the Chapter 3 wiring method articles of the NEC, namely Articles 320 through 392 (AC cable through cable trays). Notable changes include new rules for cables in thermal insulation, a new article (337) for Type P cable, clarifying the different types of service entrance cables, clarifying the rules for stainless steel raceways and fittings, and addressing cable trays that utilize flanged openings.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the proper securing and supporting requirements for cables
  • Determine when table 310.15 C1 has to be used for ampacity adjustments
  • Name the conductors allowed for direct burial
  • Given a conduit and environment, select the appropriate fittings
  • List the permitted uses of liquid tight flexible metal conduit
  • Discuss the changes for cable trays.