MSHA Safety Training Certification

Health and Safety Aspects of Tasks

Health and Safety Aspects of Tasks Courses

MSHA Safety Training Certification

Duration: 0.38 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Chinese, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

If you work with heavy loads or repeatedly twist to move materials from one location to another, you may be at a greater risk of back injury. Back injuries are suffered by more than one million workers every year, account for twenty percent of all workplace injuries, and cost companies billions of dollars. This course will help prevent back injuries at your workplace by raising awareness about the common causes of acute and cumulative back injuries, signs and symptoms of back injuries, and the engineering and administrative controls that can be implemented to prevent back injuries.

Learning Objectives

  • The need for back injury prevention
  • What the back and spine are
  • Common causes of back injuries
  • Risk factors
  • Signs and symptoms of back injuries
  • Prevention, including proper lifting technique

Duration: 0.53 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Definition of rigging and slings, importance of safe rigging, load considerations, types of slings, types of sling hitches, safe rigging practices, and commonly required personal protective equipment (PPE).

Learning Objectives

  • Define and describe rigging and slings
  • State the importance of rigging to crane operations
  • Identify the different types of sling materials
  • Describe the different types of sling hitches
  • Identify guidelines for safe rigging including sling angle, load balancing
  • Describe inspection guidelines for wire rope, chains, and hooks
  • Identify guidelines for rigging storage

Duration: 0.73 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Swedish, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Contains basic forklift operating procedures intended to increase safety and help prevent the most common forklift accidents. Provides information on the most common types of forklifts used in general industry and warehouse environments. Includes important information required by OSHA’s general industry standards (29 CFR 1910.178) as well as best practices on operating powered industrial trucks.

Learning Objectives

  • Differentiate between handling a forklift and an average automobile (rear-wheel steering, weight)
  • Identify the most common forklift accidents
  • Describe steps for refueling
  • Describe steps for recharging batteries
  • Describe the center of gravity and stability triangle
  • Describe load capacity and load center
  • Describe forklift pre-operation inspections
  • Identify safety guidelines and best practices for forklift operation

Duration: 0.62 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This course covers the importance of having industrial machine hazards properly guarded and protected against. This course is aligned with OSHA General Industry standards and industry best practices. It is meant to be used as an introductory or refresher course for general industry workers who will be operating or working near industrial machinery.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize the main goal of OSHA’s machine guarding regulations
  • Identify common machine hazards
  • Identify common behaviors that cause most machine accidents
  • Identify the requirements for machine guarding
  • Describe the three main categories of machine guarding
  • Identify examples of common machine guards
  • Describe best practices when working with machine guarding

Duration: 0.38 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

People who are exposed to cold or wet conditions sometimes can’t keep their body warm, which leads to cold stress. This course discusses the factors that increase cold stress as well as what frostbite, trench foot, and hypothermia are and how they are treated. This course also illustrates safe work practices to help with the prevention of cold stress.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the three types of cold stress which are frostbite, trench foot, and hypothermia
  • Describe the primary causes of cold stress
  • Define the factors that affect how a person tolerates cold temperatures
  • Describe the signs, symptoms, and treatments for all three types of cold stress
  • List the methods to prevent cold stress

Duration: 0.38 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Prepare yourself and your team to work safely with and around compressed gas cylinders. This course describes compressed gas cylinders and how they are commonly used. Use this course to raise awareness about potential hazards and learn best practices for storage, transport, installation, and use of compressed gas cylinders. Missile hazards and types of compressed gases are also discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Basic description of compressed gas cylinders
  • How compressed gas cylinders are used
  • Potential hazards of compressed gas cylinders
  • Best practices for storage, transport, and use of compressed gas cylinders

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Mining facilities normally have chemicals on-site that require specific labeling and documentation to inform miners about the potential chemicals hazards they may face at work. MSHA’s Title 30 CFR – Part 47 Hazard Communication standard, or “HazCom,” outlines chemical labeling and documentation requirements to help mine operators reduce injuries and illnesses for miners and mining contractors. This course provides important information on MSHA’s HazCom standard and how it relates to the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) as well as requirements for MSDS and SDS documentation.

Learning Objectives

  • State the definition of a chemical hazard
  • Describe mine operators chemical evaluation responsibilities
  • List the potential health and physical hazards of chemical exposure
  • State the purpose of a Hazard Communication, or “HazCom,” program
  • State the required elements of a HazCom program
  • Describe how OSHA’s GHS (Globally Harmonized System) relates to MSHA’s HazCom program
  • State the definition and purpose of a material safety data sheet, “MSDS,” and a safety data sheet, “SDS”
  • Describe the contents of an MSDS and an SDS
  • List label and warning requirements for hazardous chemicals

Duration: 0.47 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This course covers basic guidelines and best practices for working safely around common hydraulic equipment. From bottle jacks to forklifts and shop equipment, this course provides important information on the principles of hydraulics and the hazards that hydraulic systems can present. Based on OSHA documents and industry experience, this course is designed to help workers understand how to recognize common hydraulic hazards and avoid serious injuries.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the major components of a hydraulic system
  • Describe how hydraulic systems work
  • Describe the hazards presented by hydraulic fluid
  • Describe guidelines for installation, normal operation, inspection, repair and replacement
  • List in order the steps that should be followed in the event that a coworker is sprayed with hydraulic fluid
  • List guidelines that should be followed in the event that a coworker receives a pinhole injection of hydraulic fluid

Duration: 0.30 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Lockout/tagout can be defined as the placement of a lock or tag on an energy isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, ensuring that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be re-energized until the locking device is removed. While an authorized person usually performs the lockout, an “affected employee” is an employee that is affected by the lockout. This course will focus on the general awareness needed for these “affected employees.”

Learning Objectives

  • Define lockout/tagout
  • Describe primary and secondary energy sources
  • Differentiate between an “authorized” and “affected” employee
  • Describe the lockout and tagout process
  • Describe the procedure for restarting affected equipment

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This course provides basic guidelines for performing a job hazard analysis (JHA) in a variety of industrial workplaces. Based on industry best practices and OSHA guidelines, this course offers insights into why a JHA is a critical part of any safety program. From identifying common workplace hazards to accepted means of hazard control, this course provides the fundamental elements critical to establishing safe work habits for yourself and your team. 

Learning Objectives

  • The definition of a hazard
  • The definition of a job hazard analysis
  • The importance of the job hazard analysis process
  • How to perform a job hazard analysis
  • How to control hazards
  • When to review the job hazard analysis

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Working around mobile and stationary equipment can expose miners and others on-site to a range of physical and environmental hazards. This course discusses pre-operational equipment checks, seat belt use, equipment blind spots, and communication methods. It also illustrates hazards of working around highwalls, piles, conveyors, and other mining equipment. Based on MSHA’s Title 30 CFR Part 46.5.b.4.

Learning Objectives

  • State why wearing seat belts is important
  • Describe ways to improve visibility
  • List common workplace communication methods
  • List the steps in a pre-operational check
  • Identify best practices for operating mobile equipment
  • Identify procedures for safely working around highwalls and piles
  • Identify best practices for refueling and parking mobile equipment
  • Identify best practices for working around stationary equipment
  • State the purpose of equipment guarding
  • State the purpose of an emergency stop cord
  • Identify best practices for avoiding ejected material hazards
  • Identify best practices for avoiding airborne dust hazards

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Working with or around electricity can expose miners and others onsite to a range of hazards, including electric shock, arc flash, and even explosions and toxic chemicals when working with batteries. This course discusses the elements of an effective electrical safety program, testing electrical circuits, using extension cords, working with batteries and generators, and how to work safely around power lines. Based on MSHA’s Title 30 CFR Part 46.5.b.4.

Learning Objectives

  • List items covered in an effective electrical safety program
  • Describe how to prepare for electrical work
  • Describe the risks and process of testing electrical circuits
  • List best practices for lockout/tagout of electrical circuits
  • Describe the proper use of extension cords
  • Identify hazards and best practices for working with batteries
  • Identify hazards and best practices for working around generators
  • List best practices for working safely around power lines

Duration: 0.53 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Portuguese, French, Japanese, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

An arc flash is a release of energy that instantly superheats the air and any nearby components, causing an explosion. It’s a serious hazard when working on or near energized electrical equipment. OSHA requires that all employees understand the electrical hazards to which they are exposed. This course introduces the dangers of arc flash and presents common methods for preventing and protecting against those dangers, such as risk control hierarchy, safety boundaries, lockout/tagout, and PPE guidelines. It’s based primarily on the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace®,” which is the recognized industry resource in the United States for best electrical work practices.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “arc flash”
  • List the dangers of an arc flash
  • Identify common factors that increase the likelihood of an arc flash occurring
  • Describe risk assessment and control methods
  • Describe the basis for determining an arc flash boundary
  • Describe requirements for choosing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • List requirements for arc flash warning signs and labels
  • List common lockout/tagout procedures

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria that, if present in blood, can cause disease in humans. These pathogens can be transmitted from an infected person to a healthy person by contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids. There are a number of relatively simple actions which can be taken to drastically reduce the chance of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Depending on the type of work being done, workplace practices and methods can be modified to minimize the chance of exposure. Proper personal protective equipment is an important component in preventing the transfer of bloodborne pathogens from an infected person to a healthy person.

Learning Objectives

  • Define bloodborne pathogens
  • List common types of bloodborne pathogens
  • Describe how bloodborne pathogens are transmitted from one person to another
  • Describe techniques for transmission prevention
  • Describe what to do if exposed to a bloodborne pathogen

Duration: 0.45 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

The power to recognize and avoid injury is right at your fingertips. This course includes information on hand tools and power tools, including electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, liquid fuel, and powder-actuated power tools. Topics covered include general tool safety, maintenance, guards, best practices, and operating guidelines.

Learning Objectives

  • Hand tools
  • Power tools
  • Tool safety
  • Tool maintenance
  • Tool do’s and do not’s
  • Operating guidelines

Duration: 0.67 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Protect one of your most valuable senses with a better understanding of the anatomy of the ear, how sound works, how the ear interprets sound, the effects of noise on hearing, and annual audiometric testing. Learn how to avoid occupational hearing loss by choosing and using the right hearing protection for your job, such as ear muffs and ear plugs.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the properties of sound
  • Identify the anatomy of the ear
  • Describe how the ear interprets sound
  • Differentiate between types of noise and understand their impact on hearing
  • Describe hearing loss and how to prevent it
  • List the requirements of a hearing conservation program
  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of ear muffs versus ear plugs
  • Identify noise hazards and select the appropriate hearing protection

Duration: 0.47 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This course covers basic guidelines and best work practices for performing hot work safely. Before welding, cutting, or brazing metal or performing any work that could generate enough heat or sparks to start a fire, everyone involved should be properly trained on the fundamentals of hot work safety. Based on NFPA 51B and 29 CFR Subpart Q regarding welding, cutting, brazing, and other hot work, this course is intended to help workers recognize the potential hazards of hot work and avoid injuries and property damage by properly planning, preparing for, and performing hot work.

Learning Objectives

  • What hot work is
  • Who’s responsible for hot work safety
  • The roles of management, the permit issuer, the hot work operator, and the fire watch
  • When and where to perform hot work
  • Hot work permit requirements
  • Special hot work considerations
  • Hot work and contractors

Duration: 0.47 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Don’t count on luck, count on the lock. Protect yourself and your team from unintentional exposure to all types of hidden energy with this course that describes hazardous energy types and energy control procedures, including preparation, shutdown, isolation, lockout, stored energy check, verification, and release of lockout. Additional topics include lockout hardware and administration of an Energy Control Program (ECP). This course is intended for the “authorized employees” who typically perform lockout/tagout procedures.

Learning Objectives

  • Define lockout/tagout
  • Describe why hazardous energy is a problem
  • Differentiate between an “authorized” and “affected” employee
  • List in order and describe the six steps of an effective energy control program
  • Describe lockout hardware
  • Describe the training requirements for lockout tagout
  • Describe the role of a primary authorized employee during a group lockout
  • Describe the procedure for restarting affected equipment

Duration: 0.67 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, French, Polish
Capability: Audio, Video

Industrial facilities rely heavily on complex equipment. To run efficiently and effectively, the equipment needs regular maintenance. However, performing maintenance can introduce many safety hazards. This course addresses best practices for safely maintaining and repairing equipment.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “maintenance”
  • Identify examples of equipment maintenance in a production facility
  • Identify and describe general maintenance guidelines for workers
  • Identify and describe typical hazards presented to maintenance workers
  • Describe three different methods to ensure the immobilization of equipment
  • Describe maintenance guidelines for vehicles
  • Describe safety guidelines for using hand tools such as pry bars, hammers, and axes
  • Describe safety guidelines for using power tools and cutting torches
  • Describe safety guidelines for welding, working on conveyors, and line breaking
  • Describe good housekeeping practices

Duration: 0.67 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Every day, someone decides to give up their sight, hearing, fingers, toes, or worse to save a few seconds of effort. Sure it can be inconvenient and uncomfortable, but using personal protective equipment (PPE) properly is better than many unfortunate alternatives. Use this course to educate yourself and your team on head protection, eye and face protection, hand protection, foot protection, respiratory protection, and hearing protection.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify various types of personal protective equipment
  • State the intended purpose for different types of personal protective equipment
  • Describe specific personal protective equipment required for certain work conditions and hazards
  • Identify appropriate personal protective equipment for a given environment or task
  • Differentiate between subclasses of a given type of personal protective equipment and define their limits of protection

Duration: 0.48 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian, Swedish, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Falling at work may not seem very dangerous, but falls are the leading cause of workplace injuries. They commonly cause cuts, bruises, broken bones, back injuries, sprains, and strains. Hazards that cause slips, trips, and falls can be controlled and eliminated if they are identified, reported, and corrected. This course describes common causes of slips, trips, and falls, how they can be prevented, and first aid procedures for fall injuries.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “slips,” “trips,” and “falls”
  • Identify common causes of slips, trips, and falls
  • Identify ways to prevent slips, trips, and falls, including good housekeeping procedures
  • List tips for walking on slippery surfaces, on stairs, and in bad weather
  • List proper procedures for the use, placement, and care of ladders
  • Describe steps to take when a slip, trip, or fall hazard has been identified
  • Describe first aid steps for slip, trip, and fall injuries

Duration: 0.35 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Blocking and cribbing is a phrase which describes a variety of procedures used to stabilize heavy equipment, or large components of heavy equipment, during maintenance. Blocking refers to any of a number of methods for securing a machine, or part of a machine, while it is being worked on. Cribbing refers to the technique of stacking a group of uniform blocks to create a temporary, but sturdy, elevated structure capable of supporting a heavy load. This course describes equipment and guidelines for successful blocking and cribbing operations.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the purpose of blocking
  • Describe cribbing
  • Identify some of the blocking techniques used with heavy equipment
  • Describe the materials used for cribbing
  • Describe cribbing block care
  • Describe some of the techniques used to build a successful crib

Duration: 0.43 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

An explosion is a sudden, violent release of energy accompanied by the expansion of high-pressure gases. An explosive is any chemical compound, mixture, or device intended to create an explosion. This course discusses types of explosive materials and their UN (United Nations) hazard classifications. It reviews common explosion hazards as well as the recommended personal protective equipment. This course illustrates proper material handling, storage security, best practices for blasting operations, and explosives disposal.

Learning Objectives

  • State the definition of an explosion and an explosive
  • List examples of explosives
  • List the United Nations’ classifications of explosives
  • List common applications of commercial explosives
  • Describe common hazards of explosives
  • Describe common recommended PPE when handling explosives
  • List best practices for handling explosives 
  • List best practices for explosive storage security 
  • List best practices for blasting operations 
  • Describe requirements for safe disposal of undetonated explosives

Duration: 1.05 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Working at elevated heights presents a serious danger of falling. Falls can be caused by inattentiveness, slippery surfaces, working in awkward or out-of-balance positions, or insufficient training. This course highlights numerous methods of prevention and protection, including fall arrest systems, the equipment associated with fall prevention and protection systems, vertical and horizontal lifelines, as well as inspection and maintenance guidelines. This course also discusses associated topics such as the proper procedure for putting on a body harness, lifeline swing hazards, calculating fall space clearance, and harness suspension syndrome.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify and describe types of fall protection systems, including best practices for their use
  • List, in order, the steps to put on a body harness
  • Identify and describe different types of lanyards
  • Describe different types of anchorage points
  • Define “free-fall distance”
  • Identify and describe vertical and horizontal lifelines
  • List the calculation factors for determining fall space clearance
  • List emergency action plan steps in case of a fall
  • List inspecting and maintenance guidelines for fall protection systems
  • List fall protection use guidelines in lift equipment

Duration: 0.40 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, French, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

Heat stress can take a number of different forms, including heat rash, heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. Each of these conditions has its own signs, symptoms, and treatments. This course will help you to recognize each condition, and to know which ones require simple corrective actions, like taking a break, and which ones may require a trip to the hospital.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify the forms of heat stress
  • Define the symptoms for each form of heat stress
  • Describe how to determine the risk of heat stress
  • List methods to reduce the risk of heat stress
  • Describe treatments for persons showing symptoms of heat stress

Duration: 0.48 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Chinese, French
Capability: Audio, Video

Ladders are tools commonly used to gain access to higher levels that are otherwise unreachable. When maintained properly and used according to safety guidelines, they are a simple and effective tool. However, each year thousands of workers are either injured or killed in ladder related accidents. This course describes different types of ladders, as well as ladder construction, ladder selection, height requirements, weight capacity, hazardous conditions, inspections, ladder setup, safe practices when using ladders, storage, and maintenance.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • State the general construction of ladders
  • Differentiate between the different types of ladders
  • Select a ladder appropriate for accessing a work area
  • Set up a correct ladder height and pitch 
  • Identify equipment damage and proper ladder functionality
  • Define proper ladder storage and maintenance
  • Identify safe ladder setup locations on a worksite

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

When working on heavy construction equipment, there are often situations when you have the need to strike a metal component of a machine with a hammer. Most hammers have hardened steel heads, and there is a hidden danger in striking two hardened metal surfaces together. This action can lead to sharp pieces of metal breaking out of the hammer or the struck piece of metal at very high velocity. This course will describe why this happens and what can be done to minimize the danger and protect yourself from injury.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the primary danger of metal on metal hammering
  • Describe what is unique about hardened steel
  • List alternative work methods to avoid metal on metal impact
  • Describe safety guidelines for metal on metal work
  • Identify the proper PPE for metal on metal hammering

Duration: 0.30 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Night shift work can expose workers to a range of hazards, including sleep deprivation, limited visibility, and changing weather conditions. This course discusses what constitutes extended or unusual works shifts and the hazards associated with work pattern changes. The dangers of sleep deprivation, as well as nighttime weather hazards, are also explained along with nighttime work area lighting needs, operating mobile equipment at night, and the best practices for working outside at night.

Learning Objectives

  • State the definition of extended and unusual work shifts
  • List common hazards of night shift work
  • Describe sleep deprivation causes, symptoms, and prevention
  • Describe how nighttime weather can affect working outside
  • List lighting needs for working outside at night
  • Identify best practices for working outside and operating mobile equipment during a night shift

Duration: 0.67 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Tamil, Polish, Russian, Thai, Czech
Capability: Audio, Video

Every day, someone decides to give up their sight, hearing, fingers, toes, or worse to save a few seconds of effort. Sure it can be inconvenient and uncomfortable, but using personal protective equipment (PPE) properly is better than many unfortunate alternatives. Use this course to educate yourself and your team on head protection, eye and face protection, hand protection, foot protection, respiratory protection, and hearing protection.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify various types of personal protective equipment
  • State the intended purpose for different types of personal protective equipment
  • Describe specific personal protective equipment required for certain work conditions and hazards
  • Identify appropriate personal protective equipment for a given environment or task
  • Differentiate between subclasses of a given type of personal protective equipment and define their limits of protection

Duration: 0.47 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Working over or near water can expose workers to a range of hazards, including injuries from falls, hypothermia, and drowning. This course discusses best practices for working over or near water, including the proper use of common types of personal flotation devices (PFDs). This course also offers information on what to do in “man overboard” (MOB) situations, including survival tactics and recovery practices.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the main hazards of working over water, near water, and on marine vessels
  • Describe the five types of personal flotation devices (PFDs), including their uses
  • Identify safe work practices for working over water, near water, and on marine vessels
  • State the definition of “hypothermia” and list its symptoms and effects on the body
  • List survival factors, recovery practices, and survival methods in a “man overboard” situation