Health and Safety Training Online

Safety Management

Safety Management Courses

Health and Safety

Duration: 0.95 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This interactive online course identifies common causes of equipment failures and the steps involved with prioritizing the failure events and conducting failure investigations. The learner will be introduced to several investigative analysis tools used to forensically exam the failure and the importance of maintaining equipment histories.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • List common causes of equipment failures
  • Describe investigative analysis tools
  • Recall the importance of equipment histories
  • Identify failure events
  • List common steps to conduct a failure investigation

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

The goal is for every person to go home safe every day. To achieve this, we must all be personally accountable for safety. This module describes what it means to be accountable and how you can demonstrate personal accountability.

Learning Objectives

  • Define accountability
  • Describe what it means to be personally accountable for safety
  • Describe how to identify and control hazards in the workplace

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Accidents and major equipment failures are usually the result of several different failures or human errors occurring at the same time. This can make it difficult to analyze information and find root causes. A method such as events and causal factors analysis is useful because it organizes event data on a timeline, which provides a visual summary of an incident and makes it easy to identify relationships between relevant events and their causal factors.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the basic steps involved in events and causal factors analysis
  • Describe how to construct an event timeline
  • List and describe the conditions that should be evaluated
  • Describe how to evaluate human errors

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Every organization has policies regarding defenses, or barriers, to control hazardous energy and prevent it from coming into contact with people, or objects. For example, machine guarding keeps people from contacting moving equipment, and lockout/tagout procedures provide barriers to prevent equipment from moving when it’s being worked on. Accidents occur when barriers fail. Barrier analysis is used to determine which barriers failed and why, so it is an effective root cause analysis tool for accidents and other incidents. This module describes how to perform a barrier analysis.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the purpose of barriers and barrier analysis
  • Define the three main barrier types
  • Describe the effectiveness of each barrier type
  • List the steps involved with barrier analysis
  • Describe how to evaluate the performance of barriers

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Change analysis, also known as Is/Is Not Analysis or KT (Kepner Tregoe) Analytical troubleshooting, is a problem solving method that involves comparing a process that has failed or is performing poorly to one that is operating correctly. This module describes how to conduct a change analysis.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the purpose of change analysis
  • List the steps involved with a change analysis
  • Describe how to conduct a change analysis

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide a safe workplace for their employees. To ensure this, OSHA maintains several standards that describe employee rights for a hazard-free workplace. The Access to Medical and Exposure Records Standard (29 CFR 1910.1020) describes employees’ rights to access their medical records and information about exposure to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. This module describes employees’ right of access, what types of records they have access to, and record retention requirements for employers.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe OSHA requirements for the Access to Exposure and Medical Records Standard
  • List and describe the types of records that must be maintained
  • Describe employee rights to access medical and exposure records
  • List record retention requirements

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Human errors occur quite frequently. To prevent recurrence of the same errors, careful analysis is required to identify and eliminate the root causes of those errors. However, determining the root causes of incidents caused by worker behaviors is typically more difficult than finding the root causes of mechanical failures. This module will describe some different models and analysis methods that can help identify root causes of human errors and behavior problems.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the difference between looking for faults by the person or the process
  • List the factors that affect human behaviors
  • Define active and latent failures
  • Describe the types of human errors
  • Describe the conditions that cause human errors
  • Describe how supervisory actions and consequences affect human behaviors
  • Describe organizational factors that affect human behaviors
  • Describe general strategies for determining the root causes and implementing corrective actions for improving human behaviors

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

When an incident, or problem, appears to have resulted from a human error during the execution of a task, or procedure, a task analysis should be performed. The objective of a task analysis is to determine how a task was actually performed, compare that to how it should have been performed, and identify corrective actions that will increase the likelihood that it will be performed correctly in the future. This module describes the steps involved and how to perform a task analysis.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the objective of a task analysis
  • Describe the factors that affect the performance of a task
  • List the steps involved with task analysis
  • Describe the information that should be collected during a task analysis

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Portuguese, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

This course covers the importance of creating emergency action plans in preparation for unexpected emergencies, accidents, and evacuations at industrial workplaces. Based on OSHA standards and recognized industry best practices, this course is intended as an introduction or refresher for general industry workers and those responsible for developing an emergency action plan.

Learning Objectives

  • List items in a typical emergency action plan
  • List types of employee roles in an emergency
  • List sources for medical care in an emergency
  • Identify different types of emergency personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Describe requirements for evacuation routes, exits, and assembly points
  • State why emergency training is important

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

How many times have you thought a problem was “fixed” only to have it happen again? This happens when only the symptoms, not the underlying, or root, causes, are addressed. Root cause analysis is a generic term used to describe various methods that can be used to find and eliminate root causes so problems do not recur. This module will describe the steps involved in a root cause analysis and some tools and methods that can be used.

Learning Objectives

  • Define root cause
  • Differentiate root cause, direct cause, and contributing cause
  • Describe the basic steps involved in root cause analysis
  • Identify and describe the characteristics of a good problem statement
  • Describe some commonly used root cause analysis tools and methods
  • Identify which methods work best for certain situations

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Slips, trips, and falls (STFs) are a leading cause of work-related injuries, and the second leading cause of workplace fatalities, after motorized vehicle incidents. A comprehensive floor and walkway safety program can greatly reduce STF hazards and incidents. Among other things, this program should include floor and walkway audits and STF prevention inspections performed by trained and qualified persons. STF prevention inspections should include annual inspections, routine safety inspections, and change analyses.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “slips,” “trips,” and “falls”
  • Identify and describe three types of STF prevention inspections
  • Identify who should perform STF prevention inspections
  • Identify common STF hazards
  • List housekeeping procedures and safe work practices that can help prevent STF hazards and incidents
  • List items which should be included in inspection checklists

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Slips, trips, and falls (or STFs) are a leading cause of work-related injuries, including sprains, strains, fractures, contusions, and abrasions. STFs also account for 15% of all accidental deaths; second only to motorized vehicles as a cause of workplace fatalities. STFs also account for ~15% of workplace fatalities, second only to those related to motorized vehicles. While STFs can occur on level surfaces and at elevated heights, this course focuses only on STFs which occur on level surfaces.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “slips,” “trips,” and “falls”
  • Identify common causes and contributing factors for slips and trips
  • Describe the difference between static coefficient of friction (SCOF) and dynamic coefficient of friction (DCOF) values
  • Describe U.S. regulations for walking surfaces at worksites
  • Describe the operations of common slip resistance test devices, including a pendulum tester, tribometer, variable-angle ramp, and variable incidence tribometer
  • Describe the five “5S” housekeeping strategies
  • Describe safety guidelines related to floor surface repairs, maintenance, and cleaning; footwear; building entrances; leaks and drips; spill response; worker training; and the use of signs, barricades, and lighting

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English, Portuguese, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish
Capability: Audio, Video

As long as people work, there will be safety-related incidents and near misses. But those incidents can be used to make the workplace safer if they are investigated, analyzed, and corrected to prevent their recurrence. This course discusses reasons for incident investigations, the phases of an incident investigation, team leader responsibilities, and who comprises the investigation team. It then provides information on best practices for interviewing witnesses, determining the root cause of an incident, and corrective and follow-up actions.

Learning Objectives

  • State the reasons and importance of conducting incident investigations
  • State the three phases of an incident investigation
  • Define “root cause”
  • State the responsibilities of an incident investigation team leader
  • List methods for obtaining facts and avoiding blame when speaking to witnesses
  • State the primary objectives of an incident investigation team
  • Identify methods for determining the causes of an incident
  • List some long term corrective actions to prevent incidents from occurring in the future

Duration: 0.50 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

“Industrial hygiene” (or “occupational hygiene,” outside of the U.S.) is the discipline of evaluating and controlling workplace hazards in order to protect the health and well being of workers and the community. This involves monitoring of work environments, evaluating exposures to hazards, and employing controls to prevent or minimize exposures and their effects. This course describes the job responsibilities of an industrial hygienist, discusses common workplace hazards, and details measures that can be used to control these hazards.

Learning Objectives

  • Define the terms “industrial hygiene” and “ergonomics”
  • Describe the responsibilities of an industrial hygienist
  • List and describe common workplace hazards, including airborne contaminants, chemical hazards, biological hazards, and physical hazards, including noise hazards and ergonomic hazards
  • Describe the different types of airborne contaminants
  • Identify the components of a “worksite analysis,” including a comprehensive survey, change analysis, job hazard analysis, and regular inspections
  • Identify and describe the components of the “Hierarchy of Controls”

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has described near misses as incidents where no property was damaged and no personal injury sustained, but where, given a slight shift in time or position, damage and/or injury easily could have occurred. It has been shown that injury and damage-producing events are frequently preceded by warning signs or near miss incidents. For this reason, a program designed to identify, record, and address near miss incidents will improve worker safety and the safety culture of an organization.

Learning Objectives

  • Define the terms “near miss,” “incident,” “best practice,” “root cause,” and “controls”
  • Identify near miss incidents
  • List items that should be included in all near miss reports
  • List best practices for near miss programs
  • Identify the roles of workers, supervisors, and management in near miss programs
  • List the benefits of the proactive safety improvements generated by near miss programs
  • Identify ways to improve participation in near miss programs

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

Accidents are caused by unsafe workplace conditions or unsafe behaviors. Inspections and observations allow you to be proactive by evaluating how safe your workplace is instead of waiting until someone gets hurt. This course will provide an overview and general guidelines for performing safety inspections and observations.

Learning Objectives

  • List the two main causes of accidents
  • Describe the purpose of safety inspections and safety observations
  • Describe the differences between safety inspections and observations
  • Describe how to perform safety inspections and observations
  • List examples of what to look for while performing an inspection or observation

Duration: 0.25 Hrs

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video

This course covers the use of hot work permits at general industry facilities. A hot work permit refers to an employer’s written authorization to perform hot work operations. There is no one standard for Hot Work Permits; different facilities will have different forms and different procedures. This course serves as an introduction to the common protocols in place at most workplaces that are meant to ensure safe conditions before hot work can begin. [course outline] • Permit issuer • Safety responsibilities • The 35-foot rule • Equipment requirements • PPE requirements • Elevated Hot Work • Material considerations • Posting the permit Regulations 29 CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces 29 CFR 1910.252: Welding, Cutting, and Brazing General industry best practices

Learning Objectives

  • The worker roles involved in completing and approving the permit
  • The importance of the “35-foot rule” when planning hot work
  • Typical equipment and PPE requirements when performing hot work
  • The importance of knowing the material that hot work is being done on or near
  • The importance of posting the permit
  • A sample hot work permit
  • And other considerations

Duration: 1.00 Hr

Course Level: Intermediate
Languages: English
Capability: Audio, Video, MobileReady

Managing safety is not just something that happens – it should be managed just as quality, productivity and customer-relations are managed. Senior management establishes the overall culture at every facility. This course will review the four major elements to achieve a world class safety and health program at your facility.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Integrate safety management into your business to protect the health, safety and welfare of your employees and clients
  • List the four major safety and health program elements
  • Recognize unsafe conditions in a work area in order to maintain the health, safety and welfare of your employees
  • Prioritize the immediate steps you can take to enhance the safety program at your facility for the health, safety, and welfare of you and your employees